Tag Archives: guns

Here Are Some Examples Of How AR-15’s Can Legally Be Almost The Same As Assault Rifles [VIDEO]

As I have encountered several times over the course of debating gun control in the wake of the horrific Parkland mass shooting, pro-gun advocates really like catching people referring to AR-15’s as “assault rifles.”  They will laugh and assert that the person saying it doesn’t know what they’re talking about, and therefore dismiss their entire argument (missing the point entirely.)  So, I’m careful not to actually call AR-15’s assault rifles.  But I do refer to them as “military-style” weapons, because that is what they are.

The semantics debate obfuscates the core issues that many people have with these weapons.  What gun control advocates are often trying to say when they refer to AR-15’s in this way is simply that they (and similar weapons) are highly powerful and can fire many rounds in a short amount of time, making them ideal for mass slaughter.  AR-15’s are semi-automatic (one round fired per trigger pull) while assault weapons are fully automatic (multiple rounds fired as long as trigger is pulled.)  But one aspect of the AR-15 that helps make it popular is that it is a highly customizable rifle.  With add-ons called “bump stocks,” people are legally able to mimic full-auto fire, thus making that distinction negligible, especially for the purposes of a debate on the deadliness of these weapons.  There are other customizations such as trigger cranks and binary triggers, which may or may not be legal, but which nonetheless are readily available.

As much as pro-gun advocates will try to deny it, even though technically AR-15’s aren’t actually assault-rifles, they can be customized to mimic them.  Look at these examples of gun enthusiasts demonstrating how quickly they can shoot:

So, no, gun advocates…AR-15’s are not technically assault rifles.  But, as shown above, they can easily and legally mimic them, and don’t belong in the hands of civilians.  Period.


Photo credit:  Pixabay.com/meketrefe




A Simple Question For Gun Rights Advocates

Since the horrific shooting at a Florida high school last week, I have been engaged in many online debates concerning gun control.  One of the most typical responses against the concept of increased gun restrictions are that gun control won’t work, and usually involve comparisons to the failed War On Drugs.  Gun rights advocates say that criminals and “bad guys” will still be able to get their hands on guns, and the only thing gun control will accomplish is disarming the “good guys.”

So, I have a question to ask.  Why don’t we see more fully automatic machine guns (“assault rifles”) at very many of these mass shooting scenes?  In fact, why are these types of weapons, which were banned for civilians in 1986, and which have been heavily regulated federally since 1934, so seldom actually used in crimes in general?

I have yet to receive an answer.  I guess I’ll keep asking…


Why Are Americans So Attached To Their Guns?

Well, it’s happened again.  The seemingly daily issue of mass shootings in America has reared its ugly head once more, this time at Umpqua Community College in Oregon.  Nine dead and several others injured by a gunman who was later killed during an exchange of gunfire with police.

Still, countless mass shootings and more than 15 years after the Columbine tragedy, the issue of gun control in the United States is just as polarizing, if not more so, than ever before. With many Americans, when you begin talking about the issues of gun violence and even remotely suggest tougher gun laws, it’s like you have insulted their mother, their sister, and their favorite football team. For many, guns are as embedded into the American culture and are as vital a part of the American identity, if not more so, as all of the other rights protected in the Constitution, such as freedom of speech or religion. Taking away or limiting gun access is akin to asking many Americans for their left arm.

In terms of gun control, I would consider myself fairly moderate. I’m definitely not an advocate of taking away all guns, but I think our laws could be tougher and there are certain weapons, such as assault or “assault-style” rifles, that I don’t think belong in the hands of the average Joe. The average Joe could very well be a psychopath. I don’t believe that gun control is an end-all solution to the problem of violence in America, but I think it would help.

I have fired guns before and I did enjoy it. I understand their appeal. What I don’t understand is why many Americans seem to become so personally threatened when the issue of gun control arises. It strikes me as a fear of being powerless. A fear of tyrannical rule by the government or of being victimized by someone. If the government takes away some of our guns, then we are powerless against the inevitable intrusion into and dominance of our lives by the police, military, or the guy down the street.

These are all valid concerns and fears, but where I tend to disagree is in seeing guns as the core source of power in government. I see guns as a way for the government to protect its power, but I see that power exerted in many other, far more subtle ways. I am personally far more concerned with being told what to think or what to believe, or falling for the illusion that the people are in control in the first place. More importantly, I don’t feel empowered by guns. Somebody is always going to have more or bigger weapons. There is a certain point where I stop worrying about this. For myself, the need to feel physically powerful is outweighed by the desire to attain personal peace and to live a life that has impacted others in a positive way.

Photo credit – www.freedigitalphotos.net – vectorolie