Tag Archives: killing

Anti-Gun Control Argument Translator

After engaging with gun rights folks online for the past week, in light of the horrific mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on February 14th, I have come to the conclusion that the most commonly heard arguments against tighter gun control laws basically boil down to a singular sentiment:

“I Don’t Want To Give Up My AR-15.”

That’s what it comes down to:  “My rights to my shooting hobby and owning a military-style semi-automatic rifle outweigh other Americans’ rights to having a decent expectation of safety in public spaces such as schools, movie theaters, and churches.”  No matter how many shootings happen, or how deadly they become.  No matter if it’s children or high schoolers getting slaughtered.  Too bad.  I want my lethal toys.

Well, to this blatant selfishness on the part of gun advocates, I say “too bad.”  Too fucking bad.  AR-15’s and similar rifles have no place in a civilized society, other than in the hands of the military and police.  I don’t care what you think the 2nd Amendment entitles you to, because you’re wrong.  There is no sound argument against having sensible restrictions on these killing machines.  And rational Americans who place more value in the lives of our children than semi-automatic rifles will keep fighting until changes are made.

 

Why Are Americans So Attached To Their Guns?

Well, it’s happened again.  The seemingly daily issue of mass shootings in America has reared its ugly head once more, this time at Umpqua Community College in Oregon.  Nine dead and several others injured by a gunman who was later killed during an exchange of gunfire with police.

Still, countless mass shootings and more than 15 years after the Columbine tragedy, the issue of gun control in the United States is just as polarizing, if not more so, than ever before. With many Americans, when you begin talking about the issues of gun violence and even remotely suggest tougher gun laws, it’s like you have insulted their mother, their sister, and their favorite football team. For many, guns are as embedded into the American culture and are as vital a part of the American identity, if not more so, as all of the other rights protected in the Constitution, such as freedom of speech or religion. Taking away or limiting gun access is akin to asking many Americans for their left arm.

In terms of gun control, I would consider myself fairly moderate. I’m definitely not an advocate of taking away all guns, but I think our laws could be tougher and there are certain weapons, such as assault or “assault-style” rifles, that I don’t think belong in the hands of the average Joe. The average Joe could very well be a psychopath. I don’t believe that gun control is an end-all solution to the problem of violence in America, but I think it would help.

I have fired guns before and I did enjoy it. I understand their appeal. What I don’t understand is why many Americans seem to become so personally threatened when the issue of gun control arises. It strikes me as a fear of being powerless. A fear of tyrannical rule by the government or of being victimized by someone. If the government takes away some of our guns, then we are powerless against the inevitable intrusion into and dominance of our lives by the police, military, or the guy down the street.

These are all valid concerns and fears, but where I tend to disagree is in seeing guns as the core source of power in government. I see guns as a way for the government to protect its power, but I see that power exerted in many other, far more subtle ways. I am personally far more concerned with being told what to think or what to believe, or falling for the illusion that the people are in control in the first place. More importantly, I don’t feel empowered by guns. Somebody is always going to have more or bigger weapons. There is a certain point where I stop worrying about this. For myself, the need to feel physically powerful is outweighed by the desire to attain personal peace and to live a life that has impacted others in a positive way.

Photo credit – www.freedigitalphotos.net – vectorolie